Saturday, May 5, 2012

London in long exposure 3

Work and other matters have been fairly intense lately, so I haven't been taking too many photos, much to my dismay. I treated myself to a 10-stop ND filter a few weeks back, so that I could get lots of nice, long exposure daytime shots, but this is the only image I've managed to get with it so far.

For those of you who don't know what a ND filter is, it's basically dark glass in front of your lens that reduces the amount of light getting through (10-stop being the darkest available, i.e. you need to compensate for it by 10 stops with your camera settings).

All of which means you can stick your camera on a tripod, switch to manual mode and use slower shutter speeds in broad daylight. This one of the Albert Memorial at the southern end of Hyde Park is shot at 100 ISO, f22 (both of which further minimise the light through the lens) and 30 seconds (to catch the dreamy cloud movement).

I have been told by those who know more than me that I should try f16 for sharper results and shoot into the wind for more interesting cloud movement, so maybe I'll give that a go next, if I ever get out with my camera again...

Right, lesson over. The term "blind leading the blind" springs to mind, but that would probably be unfair on you readers...




14 comments:

  1. I am yet to buy a ND filter, but the result you got here looks great.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I like the effect you have achieved with the filter. The clarity in the memorial and the blur in the clouds really give the image a great centre. Thanks for explaining how you used the filter. I have put one on my wish list. PS the Royal Albert Memorial brings back wonderful memories of when we played tourist. I remember being in awe of the sculptures on each corner. Ciao.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for that little description, Alan. I always appreciate knowing how ohers achieve their results.

    I love the difference between foreground and background, however, I am not able to look at the image for very long at all. All the movement in the background plays on my nystagmus.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Awesome Alan, looks really great.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Very cool shot Alan, perfect in BW, I learn something with you every time I see your photos! ;-)
    I'm glad to know you bought a ND filter, I always think I should try different things; but I want to buy another camera body first. :)

    I read we should avoid using the widest and the narrow aperture if we want a very sharp shot (and the best options would be + 1 or + 2 stops for the widest and -2 or -1 stops for the smallest - sorry, I'm not sure if my English was enough to explain this...).

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'm not a photographer and half of what you wrote went over my head, and all I can say is that this is a fantastic photo of a great-looking memorial!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Oh well done Alan, brilliant image which looks even better when enlarged. I do have a dark filter but as yet not experimented with it. I find your images very inspiring, but like you it's a question of finding the time.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Ok I want one of them now. Great shot - really got my nystagmus going too - and excellent little tutorial there.
    Blind leading the blind pah >eye roll<

    ReplyDelete
  9. I really do not mind the "blind leading the blind" as I found your comments really helpful Alan. Pity that your work calls, but I hope that you do get out again with your camera and soon! In the meantime I hope to give this a go. Seems like useful feedback on your image which by the way I think is brilliant.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Aaw, thanks for all the lovely comments! I'm chuffed.
    Julie - I learnt something new from you too - had never heard of nystagmus.
    Lúcia - perfectly explained! Always remember that your English is infinitely better than most people's Portuguese:-) I knew that it was generally recommended to work one or two stops in from the widest aperture, but I hadn't realised it also applied the narrow end.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Since I first learned about apertures I knew we shouldn't work in the widest aperture, but I was surprised too when I read about the narrowest couple months ago.

    ReplyDelete
  12. A great effect Alan ... now that's what I really must buy ... a tripod!! I'm sure you'll be inspired to take more pics as your weather warms up and London comes alive for the Olympics.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Always learning, Lúcia:-)
    Thanks Dianne. Buy a tripod - you won't regret it!

    ReplyDelete

I still have lots to learn about photography. All comments or constructive criticism are very welcome!

Photoblogs